Monday's Pot o' Beans

On a completely different note, do you have recommendations on how to cook dried beans so that they taste good? :) --Carole


Carole, who obviously knows her way around a kitchen already, asked about the wonderful, marvelous, nutrient-rich (and cheap! unless you live in Ukraine) legume.

It's Monday, and we have a New Orleans carry-over tradition of Red Beans and Rice on Mondays. Only, now it's morphed into any kind of bean on Mondays. (Once upon a time, I also did laundry on Mondays, as tradition dictates. . . now I'm just thankful whenever it gets done. . .)

Red Beans and Rice is still my favorite. It's comfort food and totally divine when served with hot buttered French bread. Hubby prefers Cuban Black Bean soup with a dollop of sour cream.

While those are our most common bean-based meals, it's good to have a range of recipes to try. Most of these recipes can be modified easily for the vegan and vegetarian amongst us. However, I've found that cooking beans with just a little bit of meat makes it yummier.

I usually make a full pot of beans or a double batch, and freeze the leftovers in smallish ziplock bags. Lots of recipes call for canned black beans--having your own in your freezer is quick and inexpensive, and doesn't have the metallic taste some canned beans have. (I do the same with brown rice--DIY convenience foods.)

The Bean Report is a good resource for info on cooking beans and minimizing their oftimes unpleasant side effects. One other thing I find important is not to salt the beans until after they are cooked.

Sooooo. . .

What other bean recipes should Carole and I try?

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March 03, 2008  |  Comments (11)  |  TrackBack (0)  |  Permalink

 

 

Recipes to Try

Just a collection of recipes I want to keep handy so I can try them.

Sun Dried Tomato Hummus

Pierogi Casserole


Shiny, Happy Carrot Hummus

White Bean and Avocado Club

Crispy Falafel

Lemon Spinach Chickpeas

Garlicky Bean Spread

Hummus Hall of Fame

Potato Sourdough Starter and Herman

Herman Pancakes

Grilled Fish Tacos

Spatulatta's Chocolate Almond Biscotti

Easy Granola Bars

Chickpea and Escarole Soup in a Breadbowl

Sweet Squash Flan

Winter Sage Pesto

Coconut Curry Rice

Indian Carrot Salad

Lavender Lemonade

Chicken Mole

Artichoke Soup

A Good French Bread Recipe

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January 05, 2008  |  Comments (5)  |  TrackBack (0)  |  Permalink

 

 

Black Bean Recipes

Black beans. . . Yummy and good for you. I make a big pot o' beans and then freeze leftovers in baggies to use when I need convenience foods. (I really dislike the metallic taste of canned beans.)

But, it gets a little too routine to make Cuban Black Bean soup one day and have Bean Enchiladas the next, so I've gathered some recipes to expand my black bean repertoire.

Black Bean Chili

Black Bean Hummus

Moros y Cristianos

Spicy Black Bean Cakes

Fusion Black Bean Dip (Dare I?)

Kitchen-Sink Quesadillas

Black Bean and Tomato Quinoa

Veggie Enchiladas

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December 14, 2007  |  Comments (2)  |  TrackBack (0)  |  Permalink

 

 

Boys Will Eat Anything

I've got to say, I'm super thankful that my boys will eat just about anything. They are each allowed to choose one food that they don't have to eat, but if it is in something I prepare, they are responsible for just eating around it. Right now, the "one things" include leeks, onions, carrots and lima beans. For a long time, monkey brains were R8's "one thing" and then he realized I never serve those. . .

I'm thankful they are willing to try just about anything. One wasn't thrilled with the millet I've made a few times. I tried to convince them it was yummy by saying it was like a cross between rice and couscous. I forgot that rice had been his "one thing" for quite a while.

We had a light lunch the other day of veggies dipped in hummus and toasted pita bread. Hubby bought the hummus at the grocery store, and it reminded me of how much we all like it. It's pretty easy to make, too--and you can skip the tahini if you aren't a hummus purist.

Tonight we had deeeelicious Cuban Black Bean soup. We try to have a legume-based dinner once a week, and Black Bean soup is a fave. I forgot just how good Cuban Black Bean soup is when you're sure to season it with cumin and serve with fresh chopped onions and sour cream. Yummmm. We all had seconds.

Maybe it's the cooler weather, but I'm more inspired to cook and create in the kitchen these days. R8 is asking to make apple butter with me--I've hardly done any canning since Ukraine.


MYJAMS.JPG


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October 22, 2007  |  Comments (6)  |  TrackBack (0)  |  Permalink

 

 

Pancake Mixes

J11 is very handy in the kitchen. It took me years to be able to make good pancakes, and he's mastered it at age 11. Still, it's easiest to use a mix in the box, but when he's cooking and the other boys are eating. . . well. . . we can go through a lot of pancakes! So here are some make-your-own-mix recipes for us to try out.


Oatmeal Pancake Mix

4 cups quick cooking oats
2 cups all-purpose flour
2 cups whole wheat flour
1 cup brown sugar
1 cup non-fat dry milk
2 tablespoons cinnamon
5 teaspoons salt
3 tablespoons baking powder
1/2 teaspoon cream of tartar
Makes about 8 cups.


To cook the pancakes, beat together:
2 eggs
1/3 c. of melted butter

Little by little mix in:
2 c. of pancake mix
1 c. of water

Perfect Pancake Mix


5 cups all-purpose flour
1 1/2 cups whole wheat flour
1 cup cornmeal
1/3 cup sugar
2 tablespoons plus 2 teaspoons baking powder
2 teaspoons salt

Stir 1 1/2 cups of pancake mix, 2 eggs, and 1 1/4 cups of milk in a mixing bowl until smooth. Melt 1 tablespoon of butter in a large frying pan over medium heat. Cook the pancakes for 2 to 3 minutes on each side. Enjoy with maple syrup.

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October 20, 2007  |  Comments (1)  |  TrackBack (0)  |  Permalink

 

 

Google Goodies

New google tools make me giddy. I guess it is my inner tech-geek trying to manifest. Thanks to Gid, I've been playing around with a new google app that is still in beta: Google Recipes.

(Oddly enough, right before reading about it over at Gid's, I was googling a recipe for chili for Hubby, since I don't have all the ingredients on hand for his Mom's recipe.)

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June 25, 2007  |  Comments (2)  |  TrackBack (0)  |  Permalink

 

 

New Orleans Red Beans and Rice

Reposting, so Hubby has the recipe easily at hand. I soaked the beans last night, and he'll be cooking them today.


Red Beans and Rice. It was comfort food, as well as a staple, as I grew up. My Mom tells me how they had it every Monday, as is traditional in New Orleans. Monday is wash day, perfect for having a pot of beans simmer slowly on the back of the stove all day. Even better, if there is a leftover ham bone from Sunday dinner.

I rinsed and started soaking my red beans last night. Here is a rough recipe for New Orleans Red Beans and Rice--it's one of those recipes that becomes better as you tweak it over time and adjust it to suit your family.

2 pounds dried red beans, sorted and rinsed
Water
1/2 pound lean salt pork, bacon, or ham, diced (veggie friends--you can leave this out--but honestly, a little bacon adds a lot of flavor!)
2 medium onions, chopped
1 cup celery, finely chopped (opt.)
1 green pepper, chopped (opt.)
1-4 garlic cloves, minced
2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley
salt, to taste
cayenne pepper, to taste
TABASCO Sauce, to taste

Hot cooked rice
Hot french bread, butter

Wash and soak beans overnight. Drain beans, and cover with fresh water Add meat and bring to a low boil. Reduce heat to simmer, cover. Add onions, celery, garlic, and seasonings, either directly to the pot, or saute first, then add to pot.

Cover, simmer 1 1/2 to 3 hours longer, until beans are tender enough to smush easily with a fork. Add water while cooking, as needed. If you like, take some of the beans out, smush them and add them back to the pot for a thicker consistency.

Serve over hot, white rice wtih french bread and plenty of butter.

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June 25, 2007  |  Comments (2)  |  TrackBack (0)  |  Permalink

 

 

Fiesta Penne

Fiesta Penne

Chicken Breasts or Tenderloins
One Yellow or Red or Green Pepper
One Onion
Handful of Grape or Cherry Tomatoes
Cumin, Celery Salt, Garlic Powder, Cayenne Pepper
Penne Pasta


Start water to boil penne, and follow directions for cooking it al dente. Stirfry in olive oil in a large wok or iron skillet the amount of chicken you'd use for your family. When it is mostly cooked, dice it and add back to the skillet or wok. Add in diced pepper and diced onion. Add a bit of Cumin, Celery Salt, Garlic Powder, Cayenne Pepper to taste. After veggies are crisp-tender and chicken is all cooked, add in the grape tomatoes. When penne is cooked, drain, and toss with the veggies and meat in the wok.


This was very yummy, and was the result of me wanting fajitas and having most everything on hand, except tortillas.

Another modification--Cajun Elbows. In addition to the veggies listed above, add garlic, okra, yellow squash and/or whatever you have on hand. Instead of the seasonings above, sprinkle liberally with Tony Chachere's seasoning, paprika, and parsley. Prepare as above. Kiddos really liked this last night.

Yet another mod--Italian Ribbons. Yellow squash, green bell pepper, onion and garlic, chicken, grape tomatoes, handful of spinach, parsley, and ribbon pasta.

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May 21, 2007  |  Comments (5)  |  TrackBack (0)  |  Permalink

 

 

Ann Barlow's Crustless Quiche

Annie's Crustless Savory Quiche

3 eggs
1 3 oz. package cream cheese
1 12 oz. carton small curd cottage cheese
1/4 cup butter, softened
1/4 cup all-purpose flour
1/2 t. baking powder
1/4 t. salt
Pepper to taste
1/2 cup milk
1 cup grated cheddar cheese
1/2 cup cooked chopped ham
2 T. minced green onion
1/2 cup sliced fresh mushrooms (optional)

1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
2. Grease a 9 inch pie plate. Set aside.
3. In a large mixing bowl, beat egs. Beat in cream cheese, cottage cheese and butter until almost smooth.
4. In a small bowl, combine flour, baking powder, salt and pepper. Stir in egg mixture until thoroughly blended. Beat in milk. Pour into prepared pie plate.
5. Sprinkle with cheese and ham. Sprinkle with green onions and mushrooms.
6. Bake 30-40 minutes.

(This quiche is good and very easy. I actually make the whole thing in my cuisinart and it turns out really well.)

Happy eating!

This was super-yummy, my boys loved it, and we're adding it to our regular rotation. I copied this here for convenience--however, Annie's blog has great recipes posted regularly.

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April 14, 2007  |  Comments (0)  |  TrackBack (0)  |  Permalink

 

 

Uncle Jonathan's Iced Coffee

I'm writing down the recipe I was given verbally last night, so I don't forget. This is by far the best iced coffee I've ever had. (High caffeine, sugar and fat content, no wonder it tastes yummy!)

Uncle Jonathan's Iced Coffee

12 c. spring water
1 c. fresh ground coffee

Brew coffee. Pour hot coffee into a large pot. Add and stir well:

1 qt. half/half
1 qt. whole milk
1 c. sugar

After blended well, put into clean mason jars. As it cools, the coffee will form a bit of a seal. Store in the fridge. It will keep for about a week, but I guarantee you it won't last that long!


This was served to us, along with the best Italian dinner we've ever had when we were guests at Hubby's sister's home last night. "Uncle Jonathan" is her husband--my bil, not uncle!

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March 10, 2007  |  Comments (5)  |  TrackBack (0)  |  Permalink

 

 

Variations on a Bean

New Orleans Style Red Beans and Rice
(Andouille or Kielbasa Sausage Optional)
Served with French Bread and Butter

Cuban Black Beans
(Cooked with Bacon, Optional)
Rice

Stormy Black Bean Soup (Vegan)
With Cornbread

Pinto Beans
(Cooked with Bacon, Optional)
Served with Cornbread or Tortillas

Tacos/Tostadas
Substitute Black Beans for Ground Beef
Or add beans to sauteed ground beef and mix together.

Southwest Casserole
Combine roughly equal parts of beans, rice, canned corn, and canned tomatoes (with peppers is best.) Heat and serve. Melting cheese on top is optional.

Split-Pea Soup
(With ham, optional)
Served with hot rolls and butter

White Bean Chili
Served with cornbread and butter

Hummus and Dipping Veggies
Served with toasted pita
(Hummus Recipe 2, Recipe 3)


Most of these recipes can be modified easily for the vegan and vegetarian amongst us. However, I've found that cooking beans with just a little bit of meat makes it yummier.

Hint: Make a full pot of beans or a double batch, and freeze the leftovers in smallish ziplock bags. Lots of recipes call for canned black beans--having your own in your freezer is quick and inexpensive, and doesn't have the metallic taste some canned beans have. I do the same with rice.

Addendum: Read The Bean Report for good info on cooking beans and minimizing their oftimes unpleasant side effects.

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October 16, 2006  |  Comments (3)  |  TrackBack (0)  |  Permalink

 

 

Wheatie's Easy Coq au Vin

COQ AU VIN

1 3 lb fryer (cut up) or 2 lbs. boneless chicken breasts
1/2 c. all-purpose flour
1 tsp. salt
1/4 tsp. freshly ground pepper
6 slices bacon
6 sm. onions, diced
1/2 lb. mushrooms, washed, trimmed and quartered
4 carrots, halved and cut into 2-inch lengths
1 c. chicken broth
1 c. red burgundy wine
1 clove garlic, crushed
2 shallots, minced
1 tsp. each of rosemary, thyme and parsley
1 TBS olive oil

Dredge chicken in mixture of salt, pepper and flour. Brown chicken on all sides in olive oil. Place in crockpot. Combine remaining ingredients and pour over chicken. Cook all day on low. Enjoy !

Wheatie says, "This is the easiest recipe for Coq au Vin, even if it's not the most authentic."

TulipGirl's Notes: This is delish! Great for guests and easy to double. If making it for guests, I usually used chicken breasts cut into thirds, rather than cutting up a chicken. In Ukraine, I usually cooked it on low in the oven for sevearl hours instead of in a crockpot.

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October 12, 2006  |  Comments (4)  |  TrackBack (0)  |  Permalink

 

 

Granola Recipes To Try

I usually make variations of Chunky Granola or Mollie Katzen's Dry Roasted Granola. One of my Saturday projects is to make several batches of granola to stock up for the next several weeks.

I googled granola recipes because I wanted to introduce variety beyond my usual experimentations, and I'm posting them here both to share to add to my Computer Cookbook.

Maple Granola
(Vegan)

Preheat your oven to 350 degrees:

Dump into a big bowl, and stir until the oats are evenly coated:

10 cups rolled oats
1 tsp salt
1 1/4 cup real maple syrup

As with the other granolas I posted about, spread it all out on a
large cookie sheet and bake for 30 minutes, taking it out every five
minutes to stir it around, and keep it in an airtight container
shortly after taking it out of the oven, so it stays very crunchy.

You wouldn't believe how good this was! If you're reading this and
thinking "that sounds too sweet for cereal", well, think of it as a
snack then -- it's very crispy and when you're crunching it up in your mouth it really does taste like you're eating some kind of fancy maple cookie.

TulipGirl's Notes: I added wheatgerm and flax seed to the oats, and used a little less maple syrup, because I didn't want to run out for our next pancake day.



Gingersnap Granola Recipe

Serves/Makes: 6 cups

Ingredients:
3 cups oat bran
2 cups oats (quick or old-fashioned, uncooked)
2 tablespoons margarine
1/2 cup honey
2 tablespoons light or dark molasses
2 teaspoons grated lemon peel
1 teaspoon vanilla
1/2 teaspoon ground ginger
1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon-
1/4 teaspoon salt, optional

Directions:

Heat oven to 350 degrees. Spray a 15-by-10-inch jelly roll pan or rimmed baking sheet with no-stick cooking spray. In large bowl, combine oat bran and oats; mix well and set aside.

Put margarine in 2-cup microwavable bowl. Microwave on high (1 00 percent power) 30 to 45 seconds or until melted. Add remaining ingredients; mix well. Drizzle over combined cereals, stirring until evenly coated; spread evenly in pan.

Bake 25 to 30 minutes or until golden brown, stirring every 10 minutes. Cool granola in pan on wire rack. Store tightly covered.

TulipGirl's Note: I added chopped candied ginger to this recipe, too.



Homespun Granola

1 1/2 cups Old fashioned oats
1/2 cup chopped nuts
1/2 cup shredded coconut
1/2 tsp. cinnamon
2 tablespoons melted butter
2 tablespoons honey
1/2 tsp. vanilla
1/2 cup raisins or dried fruit

Mix oats, nuts, coconut & cinnamon in ungreased baking pan. Combine melted butter, honey and vanilla. Pour over dry ingredients. Bake 30 minutes in a 350 degree oven, stirring every 10 minutes. When evenly golden-colored, remove from pan, add raisins. Store tightly.

TulipGirl's Notes: Did variations on this including Almond/Blueberry and Coconut/Soy Nut/Pineapple.


I like to shop at Bulk-N-Natural, a store in the Mennonite section of the city. They have a natropath on hand, which is nice for getting "Yes, that's really nothing to worry about" answers when I have obscure questions about the boys. I sometimes get organic oats, but usually my pocketbook wins and I simply get the bulk oats or bulk quick oats. I also buy my almonds, dried fruits, wheatgerm and other granola ingredients there. I want to support local businesses and be careful with our budget.

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October 07, 2006  |  Comments (5)  |  TrackBack (0)  |  Permalink

 

 

Green Thai Curry

I love Thai food. My attempts at it, while yummy, have never quite reached the divine flavors of the Bangkok Restaurant's Pad Prik Coconut or Red Curry.

KatieKind mentioned making Thai Green Curry the other night, so I asked for her recipe. She kindly obliged, and I'm reposting it so I can find it easily in the future. (I search my blog for bits and pieces I save all the time. . .) I had several of the foundational ingredients on hand, but bought fish sauce for the first time today.

So, thanks to KatieKind:

This is one of those recipes that calls for a couple of exotic ingredients. You can get fish sauce and Thai green curry paste at a Thai or international grocery. We bought a bottle of fish sauce and a container of green curry paste a year or two ago at Gloria's (an international grocery in our town) and have kept them in the fridge ever since. They are just fine. I grow basil every summer because it is so wonderful. If you live in my town and need some for a recipe, let me know.


Green Thai Curry

1 can coconut milk, divided
1 t green Thai curry paste (to taste--a heaping teaspoon in this recipe was plenty for me, I'm wimpy)
1 onion thinly sliced (flexible)
handful sliced green or red peppers if you have them
2 cups veggies, steamed (flexible)
1 minced green onion (flexible)
bamboo shoots if you have them
1 pound-or so-chicken breasts, chopped into 1 inch pieces
oil to saute chicken in
1 or 2 t sugar
1 t fish sauce -- slop in according to taste
fresh lime juice--squeeze in a nice juicy half-lime or to taste
handful chopped cilantro
sliced fresh basil leaves--some for sauce, some for garnish
serve over rice with additional lime, cilantro, and basil as desired

Instructions
1. In largish pot, bring 1/4 can of the coconut milk and the curry paste to simmer. Stir in the rest of the can of coconut milk, sugar, and fish sauce. Bring to a simmer; let cook 1 minute.

2. Meanwhile you've steamed the veggies.

3. Meanwhile you've also sauteed the chicken and onion slices in oil--make sure chicken is cooked through.

4. Add chicken and veggies to coconut milk mixture. Add bamboo shoots if you have them. Add chopped cilantro, lime and basil. Mix well, make sure everything's nice and hot.

Serve over rice.

This was more than plenty for three.


Update: I roughly doubled the recipe for our crew, hoping to have lots of leftovers. We didn't. *grin* The fish sauce makes a big difference. I think it would have likely tasted better had I used another can of coconut milk--or maybe if I didn't use the "lite" coconut milk. This recipe will definitely go into the regular rotation. And I forgot the basil, even though I have some growing fresh in my kitchen.

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September 04, 2006  |  Comments (6)  |  TrackBack (0)  |  Permalink

 

 

Chocolate Cake Shots

From the Lizard Eater:

Chocolate Cake Shots

Okay, first of all, I swear this isn't a snipe hunt. When my brother gave me the recipe, I just knew he was pulling my leg. He wasn't. I'm not. Try it.

Layer equal parts vodka and Frangelico in a shot glass.

Take a lime and quarter it. Take a quarter and dip it in sugar. Sugar, not salt.

Bite and suck. Hold the juice. Take the shot. Hold it all in your mouth and count to four.

Swallow.

Tastes like you've just taken a bite of rich, dark, chocolate cake.

Warning: quite dangerous. The first time a person has this, they get a peculiar look on their face. Then they say, "Wow, it really does taste like chocolate cake!" Then they say, "Let me try it again to see if that happens the second time... fourth time ... eighth time ..."


I wanna try these. . .

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July 05, 2006  |  Comments (0)  |  TrackBack (0)  |  Permalink

 

 

Finally. A Pancake Recipe I Can Make.

I used to not be able to make pancakes. No matter how I tried, they flopped. I finally found success in Ukraine, when I used a recipe for crepes from a little paperback Betty Crocker cookbook that was given to me by one of the single guys on our team.

We ate crepes instead of pancakes for a couple of years, and then I found this recipe for Thin Pancakes. It's easy, makes large batches without problems, and the family loves them. When our church plant met on Saturday nights, part of our Sunday morning tradition was having these pancakes.

With recipes, the ingredients and amounts are not copyright protected, but the instructions and tips are. So, please visit this link for the well-written hints on how to make fabulous thin pancakes. However, for my own easy reference, I'm posting the ingredients here, in the proportions we usually use:


Serves 6, plus leftovers

Flour, 6 cups
Sugar, 6 tablespoons
Baking powder, 6 teaspoons
Salt to taste
Butter, 6 ounces, melted
Eggs, 6
Milk, 6 cups
Water

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June 19, 2006  |  Comments (3)  |  TrackBack (0)  |  Permalink

 

 

Summertime Supper

Tonight we had:

Collard Greens from the Organic Co-Op
Watermelon from Fruitville Road Detwiler Farms
Tomato Sandwiches from our Neighbors (homeschool, OPC)
Corn from a can

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June 12, 2006  |  Comments (6)  |  TrackBack (0)  |  Permalink

 

 

Pork Chops With Herbed Cream Sauce

I made this for dinner tonight, and it turned out so well that I'm posting it here to share and keep for future reference. I served this with yellow crookneck squash and onions sauteed together in olive oil, and red potatoes and leeks drizzled with olive oil and broiled in the oven. The family loved it, and we had no leftovers. The recipe is a spin-off from a Betty Crocker one that I bought when I was in 6th grade.

Pork Chops With Herbed Cream Sauce

4 pork chops
2 TBSP of butter/margarine
1 carrot, chopped fine
6 mushrooms, chopped fine
3 teaspoons flour
1/2 tsp dried basil
1/2 tsp beef boullion
1/2 TBSP dried parsley
1 cup milk
1 capful brandy/water

Cup each pork chop in half.*

Melt 1 TBSP of butter in a skillet. Salt and pepper the chops. Cook them over medium heat for about five minutes. Turn chops and add the other TBSP of butter, carrots, and mushrooms. Stir the veggies around the chops occasionally, but let the chops cook and get browned. When chops are no longer pink (5-7 more minutes) remove from pan and set aside. To the drippings and veggies, stir in herbs. If you use fresh herbs, double the amount listed above. Stir in flour and boullion. Add milk all at once. Stir and cook until bubbly and thickened. Stir in brandy. Add pork chops back to skillet, and heat thoroughly. Serve chops with sauce spooned over them.

This is a recipe I would make for guests, too. As long as they weren't vegetarian or kosher.


*There are six people in our family, so this ends up being two pieces for Dad, one piece for Mom and each boy, and an extra piece for whoever needs seconds. With boneless, skinless chicken breasts, I either cut them in thirds or halves--depending on the size. This both encourages eating more veggies and helping the meat go further. When the boys are bigger, I assume I'll need to increase the amount of meat I buy for each meal. However, I plan to contine making the portions smaller and then encouraging those who are still hungry to have seconds, instead of serving the size that is sold at the grocery store.

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June 09, 2006  |  Comments (2)  |  TrackBack (0)  |  Permalink

 

 

Organic Cilantro-Lime Salsa

With the goodies from our organic co-op last week, I made Cilantro-Lime Salsa. Four small jars are gifts for the boys' school teachers. I haven't done any canning since returning from Ukraine, so I did note for the teachers to store it in the fridge rather than on the shelf.

This is my standard recipe for Salsa for canning. There is a temptation to use more peppers/onions, but to keep it safe the ratio acidic:non-acidic ingredients needs to stay consistent with this recipe. The batch I did this week was much smaller than the recipe, but maintained the proportions.

Salsa for Canning

5 lb tomatoes
1 lb green peppers
1/3 lb jalapenos
1 lb onions
1 cup vinegar, 5% acidity
3 tsp salt
1/2 tsp freshly-ground black pepper


If you want chunky salsa, take the time to cut the ingredients into uniform sizes. This can be time consuming, but rewarding. After I discovered the ease of using the blender, I've opted for less-chunky salsa.

Whir tomatoes and other ingredients in a blender. Tomatoes can simply be halved. Onions and bell peppers quartersed. Clean all seeds from peppers (you may want to use gloves.) Keep the vinegar aside and add to blender as necessary to help as it chops the veggies.

Roma or paste tomatoes work better than large, wet-juicy sandwich tomatoes. Vine or hothouse ripened have a better flavor than gas ripened. Go for the freshest, bestest ingredients when canning!

Combine ingredients in a large saucepan and bring to boil. Reduce heat and simmer for at least 10 minutes. Personally, I like how salsa tastes after it's simmered for at least and hour. But if you like the "fresher" taste, 10 minutes is sufficient.

Follow standard canning instructions for sterilizing jars. Fill jars--pints are good for gift giving. Larger bottles are better when you live in Ukraine and are stocking up on salsa for the year. Leave a 1/2-inch headspace. Adjust lids and process for 20 minutes in a waterbath canner.

When canning salsa, be sure to keep the vinegar/tomato/other veggie proportions accurate, for safety.


Today's variation included:
Organic fresh cilantro, one bunch
Organic jalepeno peppers, only 3
Organic limes, 2 peeled and blended
Vine-ripe, local-grown roma tomatoes
Garlic



Update: I'm a tad disappointed in this batch. I think I should have added just a squeeze of lime juice near the end of cooking, and maybe used less cilantro. . .

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May 17, 2006  |  Comments (9)  |  TrackBack (0)  |  Permalink

 

 

Menu Planning Meanderings. . .

I enjoy puttering around the kitchen, preparing nourishing food for my family, blessing our neighbors and guests.

I'm less fond of having to cook.

And the way our life is right now, I've found myself very tired and wanting to spend less and less time in the kitchen, thinking, preparing, cleaning.

A couple of weeks ago I even resorted to. . . true confession time here. . . hamburger helper.

And while I'm borderline-vegetarian, Hubby isn't. He's willing to do meatless occasionally, as long as the food is hot and plentiful. But he's a carnivore at heart.

As are our boys who are growing like weeds. An extra potato for the pot no longer suffices.

All that put together, and I was in need of a bit more attention to meals and planning. Still with limited time and energy. With those restrictions, I'm pretty pleased with the meals stocked up and planned for the coming weeks.

I spent a little time planning on Friday, and did some marketing at Jessica's Organic and the grocery store. It was my first time at Jessica's. WMNF was on when I arrived, so I didn't miss the newstory that I'd been following, and wow--I've never seen such gorgeous heads of lettuce. I still need to go to Fruitville Market, better prices for local produce, even if it isn't organic. I need to make a trip to the little Mennonite health food shop for bulk items. My sis makes all her breads, and that sounds so appealing. But at this point we are content with stocking up on bread from the Pepperidge Farm Outlet.

Over four hours or so this afternoon, I spent probably two hours actually working in the kitchen. And I have ready for the coming weeks:

Two Meals of Southeast Asian Chicken Curry w/ Rice
Two Meals of Sloppy Joes
Two Meals of Chicken Enchilada Casserole
Two Meals of Beef Fajitas
One Meal of Chicken Divine
Four Extra Quart Bags of Rice
Two Quart Bags of Chicken Stock

And I have black beans soaking for tomorrow, which will then lead to two meals of chili, along with black beans and rice.

And I have the fixings for salads, breakfasts, and school lunches.

I'm feeling pretty pleased with how this went. I need to remind myself to do the little bits of planning ahead of time, and then go ahead and jump into it.

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February 11, 2006  |  Comments (12)  |  TrackBack (0)  |  Permalink

 

 

Fresh Ginger Gingerbread Recipe

This recipe was originally posted here at TulipGirl last December. I'm reposting it, as I print it out for a shopping trip tomorrow. It's one of my favorite holiday recipes and nothing beats the flavor of fresh ginger root in this recipe. We'll be using gingerbread men as gift tags for presents this year.

Gingerbread Men

4 cups plain white flour
2 cup raw sugar
1 teaspoon bi-carb soda
2 teaspoon cinnamon
1 teaspoon of salt
4 full teaspoons of freshly chopped ginger (3+ inches of ginger root)
1 teaspoon ground dry ginger (opt)
250g (8 oz.) butter
4 small eggs
2 teaspoon golden syrup or honey

Sift the flour into a bowl and add the soda, cinnamon and salt. Rub in the butter until it all crumbles, then add the sugar, working it all into a dough. Grate the ginger or cut very finely. Finally add the beaten eggs and golden syrup and mix it all together. (Using your hands works best.)

Place some flour on a clean surface and roll out the dough flatly. If the mixture is still too sticky, add a little bit more flour. Cut into shapes and place on a greased tray and bung it in the oven at 180 C for about 15 to 20 minutes, leave to cool on the tray and eat them.

I've found that the ginger flavor matures if you refrigerate the dough overnight or store the cookies in a tin for a day or so. We piped details in white frosting on these last year, and they were our primary tree decoration. They still tasted yummy after hanging on the tree for awhile!


I found this recipe online several years ago and didn't copy the url or author at the time. I'd like to give proper credit where it is due, but since I can't. . . I don't want to deprive y'all of such a good recipe and am posting it anyway.

Update: Thanks to Evers, here is the source of the original recipe.

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December 05, 2005  |  Comments (5)  |  TrackBack (0)  |  Permalink

 

 

Cranberry Sauce with Cabernet

2c cabernet, or other dry red wine you like
1c sugar
1c brown sugar
1/2c apple juice
6-12 cloves, depending on your taste
2 cinnamon sticks
1t ginger
1 orange, sliced
1lb fresh cranberries

Combine all ingredients EXCEPT the cranberries and simmer until reduced to about 2c liquid. For me this takes about 15 min. Beware the mess on your stove. Strain the liquid and discard the cloves, cinnamon, and orange slices. Return the liquid to the pot and add the cranberries. Stir until they all pop. From here you can keep stirring, but I mash it up with a potato masher. Enjoy!


(Via TrinMama)

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November 10, 2005  |  Comments (4)  |  TrackBack (0)  |  Permalink

 

 

Chunky Granola, Revisited

Just for Thicket Dweller. *grin* Also check out Lactating Mama's High-Calorie Granola Bars.

Originally posted March 2004:


It's been fun experimenting with granola here in Kyiv. I have an abundance of inexpensive kasha grains readily available--I can't identify them all and my Russian dictionary doesn't give much detail beyond "grain cereal." I think we've used oats, wheat, corn, buckwheat, millet, and I'm not sure what else.

My favorite recipe is Mollie Katzen's stove-top, dry roasted granola. (I believe is in her "Enchanted Broccoli Forest" cookbook.) It's best for small batches of granola.

For large batches, I like this recipe. It is low-fat and I can adjust it to be low-sugar. The technique that makes it "chunky granola" also helps the smaller, crushed grains, be part of the chunks instead of gathering at the bottom of the granola jar.

CHUNKY GRANOLA

8 c Rolled oats
1 c Nuts (more if desired -- up to double this amount)
1/2 c Sunflower seeds
1/2 c Whole millet -OR- whole buckwheat groats
3 c Whole wheat flour (or more)
-OR- part cornmeal, rice flour,or other whole-grain flour
1 t Salt (or more, as desired)
1/2 c Honey (or more, -- up to double this amount)
1 c -Hot water, or up to:
2 c -Hot water *
1 t Vanilla

* Note: More water makes the granola chunkier, less makes it crumbly.

Preheat oven to 350 F. In a large bowl or pot, combine oats, nuts, seeds, millet, flour, and salt. Mix together honey, water, and vanilla, and stir into dry ingredients. Spread on a lightly oiled baking sheet and squeeze mixture together to form small chunks, but don't crowd; the chunks need to bake clear through. Roast until golden brown, about 10 to 20 minutes. (With the larger amount of water, reduce heat and bake longer.) As it bakes the granola may need stirring to brown evenly. Cool thoroughly before storing.

Variations: Replace part of the water with the freshly squeezed juice of 2 oranges (and add the grated rinds if the oranges were not sprayed with pesticides), or use 2 teaspoons orange oil.

For "gingerbread" granola, use half molasses (for half honey) and add 2 teaspoons cinnamon, 1 teaspoon ginger and 1/4 teaspoon cloves.

For a nice change, substitute maple syrup for honey.

Source: "Diet for Small Planet" by Frances Moore Lappe


Family Favorites:

* Pina Colada Granola: No nuts, dried coconut, dried pineapple bits, coconut sweetened condensed milk

* Carmel Apple Crunch: Dried apples, raisins, dinnamon, carmel sweetened condensed milk, walnuts


Variations:

* I like to use sweetened condensed milk in place of the honey, because it is less expensive and I can get flavored milks here (peach, coconut, strawberry, lemon.) I usually use half a can for a big recipe--I find I need very little sweetner when adding dried fruits.

* I like to add a handful or two of store bought cereals--rice puffs, corn flakes, whatever--to give a little more variety to the texture.

* I use a cream-of-wheat type kasha in place of the flour in this recipe, and use a bit less than the recipe suggests.

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October 08, 2005  |  Comments (0)  |  TrackBack (0)  |  Permalink

 

 

Sweet & Spicy Pumpkin Seeds

My friend Laura shared this recipe under the name "The Absolute Best Pumpkin Seeds Ever." I'd have to agree. I'm posting this at my sister's request as she pickles a pumpkin and roasts the seeds.


1 C pumpkin seeds
5 Tbs sugar
1/2 tsp kosher salt
1/4 tsp cumin
1/4 tsp cinnamon
1/4 tsp ginger
pinch cayenne pepper
1 1/2 Tbs peanut oil (I use olive)

Heat over to 250. spread seeds out on non stick surface and bake until dry, about 1 hour. Combine 3 Tbs sugar and spices in bowl. Heat peanut oil in large non stick skillet over high heat. Add seeds and 2 TBS sugar. Cook and stir until sugar melts and starts to caramelize, about 49-60 seconds. Pour seeds in bowl and coat with spice mixture. Spread on paper towels to dry. You will not regret making this recipe, TRUST ME!

10/07/05:
I just made this recipe again and realized there are some modifications that I like. First I use about half of the oil than is recommended in the recipe (and I substitute olive oil for the peanut oil.) Also, I prefer the pumpkin seeds with shells on, rather than the "pepitas." Personally, I prefer the recipe with a little less salt and definitely including the pinch of cayenne (which I don't have on hand today.)

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September 27, 2005  |  Comments (1)  |  TrackBack (0)  |  Permalink

 

 

New Orleans Red Beans and Rice

Red Beans and Rice. It was comfort food, as well as a staple, as I grew up. My Mom tells me how they had it every Monday, as is traditional in New Orleans. Monday is wash day, perfect for having a pot of beans simmer slowly on the back of the stove all day. Even better, if there is a leftover ham bone from Sunday dinner.

I rinsed and started soaking my red beans last night. Here is a rough recipe for New Orleans Red Beans and Rice--it's one of those recipes that becomes better as you tweak it over time and adjust it to suit your family.

2 pounds dried red beans, sorted and rinsed
Water
1/2 pound lean salt pork, bacon, or ham, diced (veggie friends--you can leave this out--but honestly, a little bacon adds a lot of flavor!)
2 medium onions, chopped
1 cup celery, finely chopped (opt.)
1 green pepper, chopped (opt.)
1-4 garlic cloves, minced
2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley
salt, to taste
cayenne pepper, to taste
TABASCO Sauce, to taste

Hot cooked rice
Hot french bread, butter

Wash and soak beans overnight. Drain beans, and cover with fresh water Add meat and bring to a low boil. Reduce heat to simmer, cover. Add onions, celery, garlic, and seasonings, either directly to the pot, or saute first, then add to pot.

Cover, simmer 1 1/2 to 3 hours longer, until beans are tender enough to smush easily with a fork. Add water while cooking, as needed. If you like, take some of the beans out, smush them and add them back to the pot for a thicker consistency.

Serve over hot, white rice wtih french bread and plenty of butter.

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September 06, 2005  |  Comments (10)  |  TrackBack (0)  |  Permalink

 

 

Maw Maw's Pralines

Maw Maw's Pralines

2 c brown sugar
1 c white sugar
1 c pecans
1/3 - 1/2 stick butter
3/4 - 1 c milk
1 tsp vanilla

Heat all except vanilla--stir constantly until sugar is dissolved. Let it cook to a soft ball--medium first, then low heat. Take off heat and add vanilla. Cool without stirring. Beat until almost losing gloss--don't overdo. Drop by spoonfuls onto waxed paper laid on newspaper to help pralines from cracking.


(My Maw Maw makes this recipe from memory, and dictated the directions to me as she cooked it. I think I wrote down this recipe when I was about 12. My pralines are never quite as good as Maw Maw's.)

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September 02, 2005  |  Comments (3)  |  TrackBack (0)  |  Permalink

 

 

Good to Know

How to Season and Care for a Wok

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June 17, 2005  |  Comments (0)  |  TrackBack (0)  |  Permalink

 

 

Black Thai Pork

Black Thai Pork

4 boneless pork chops, cut into stir-fry strips
1 cup salsa OR picante sauce
1/2 cup peanut butter
2 tablespoons soy sauce
2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar
1 tablespoon molasses
1 tablespoon water
1 teaspoon chili powder
1/2 teaspoon ground ginger
1/2 teaspoon garlic salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper
1 tablespoon vegetable oil
1 tablespoon sesame seed, toasted if desired
2 tablespoons thinly sliced green onions
3 cups hot cooked cellophane noodles or rice

1. For sauce, in a medium saucepan combine salsa, peanut butter, soy sauce, vinegar, molasses and water. Bring to boiling, stirring often. Keep warm.
2. Meanwhile, in a plastic or paper bag combine chili powder, ginger, garlic salt and pepper. Add pork strips; shake until pork is coated with spice mixture.
3. In a large skillet heat vegetable oil over medium-high heat; cook and stir pork strips for 2 to 3 minute or until cooked through.
4. Spoon the sauce onto individual plates. Arrange the pork strips on top of sauce. Sprinkle with sesame seed, then top with green onions. Serve with noodles or rice.

Makes 5 servings.

Nutrition Facts
Calories 420 calories
Protein 24 grams
Fat 19 grams
Sodium 710 milligrams
Cholesterol 45 milligrams

(From CooksRecipes.Com)

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April 22, 2005  |  Comments (3)  |  TrackBack (0)  |  Permalink

 

 

Spices in Any Language

Gernot Katzer's Spice Pages are amazing!

Not only can you look up your old, familiar spices to find out what they are called in many other languages, but the search function operates in other languages, too!

Today I discovered that the Шалфей I bought is sage. *grin* I wish I had discovered this three years ago. . .

Not only does this site provide the names of spices in various languages, but also the botanical names, photos, illustrations, uses of spices, cultural info and recipes. An amazing resource for the gourmand, or simply curious.

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March 22, 2005  |  Comments (7)  |  TrackBack (0)  |  Permalink

 

 

Easy Beef Bourguignonne

I bought a wonderful Merlot for this recipe. (Only $2--I know Jay and Godric are jealous!) So, I'm sitting here sipping wine and delaying on starting dinner. . .

EASY BEEF BOURGUIGNONNE

2 lbs lean stewing beef
3 - 4 TBS flour
1 tsp each, garlic powder, onion powder, dried parsley, salt & pepper
1 bay leaf (just for you, Bayou !)
1 cup dry red wine
1 cup water
1 cup beef broth
1/2 cup worcestershire sauce
2 cups mushrooms, sliced
2 large onions, diced
olive oil

Saute onions and mushrooms in olive oil and place in crockpot. Combine flour, garlic powder, onion powder, salt, pepper and parsley in a large bowl. Toss meat in, lightly coating each piece. Shake off excess flour and place in the crockpot. Add wine, water, broth, worcestershire sauce and bay leaf. Cook on low for 8 hours or on high for 4. Remove bay leaf before serving. Serve with buttered noodles.

NOTE: If you don't have a crockpot, you can also cook this in a sealed oven dish for 2 - 3 hours at 300 degrees.

NOTE II: For a little added zing, you can also add a few shakes of A-1 sauce to the sauce, if you like.

Again, a classic from Ellen.

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March 16, 2005  |  Comments (15)  |  TrackBack (0)  |  Permalink

 

 

Lactating Mama's High-Calorie Granola Bars

Lactating Mama's High-Calorie Granola Bars

Two different quantities are listed for each ingredient - the first if if using a 10 1/2" X 15 1/2" jelly roll pan, the second is if using a 13" X 18" jelly roll pan.

4 or 6 cups oats
2/3 or 1 cup coconut oil (or melted butter for non-vegans)
1/2 or 3/4 cup honey, molasses, or maple syrup (or combination)
2 or 3 eggs or equivalent in eggs substitute
1/2 or 3/4 tsp. vanilla
1/2 or 3/4 tsp. salt
up to 1 or 1 1/2 cups of any or all of the following: shredded coconut, raisins, almonds, walnuts, pecans, flax seeds, sunflower seeds, chocolate or carob chips, and/or your favorite nuts/seeds/dried fruit.

1. spread oats on baking sheet and bake at 350' for 15-20 minutes to toast. can bake longer at lower temp or shorter at higher temp depending on your schedule. should be a nice golden brown when finished.

2. transfer oats to large bowl. add salt and any other chosen dry ingredients and mix to blend.

3. combine wet ingredients in smaller bowl, and mix until blended.

4. add wet ingredients to dry ingredients and mix well.

5. press mixture into greased jelly roll pan of appropriate size (see above). you can also line the pan with parchment paper instead.

6. bake at 350' for 20 minutes. cool. cut into bars. store in refrigerator in sealed container.

*if using chocolate/carob chips either a)allow oats to cool before adding the chips to the mix or b)after pressing mixture into pan, sprinkle chips on top and press the chips into the mix.

*you can substitute additional honey/maple syrup/molasses for the eggs/egg substitute, but the bars are a bit more sticky and have less protein.

super yummy. lots of calories. lots and lots of oats.

(Via Atarah, posted here.)

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February 19, 2005  |  Comments (12)  |  TrackBack (0)  |  Permalink

 

 

Gingerbread Men

I finally got out to a grocery that had eggs, and bought two 10s of them. (What is the English word for a group of ten? We don't buy things by the dozen here.)

I taught J8 how to read a recipe today, double checking the ingredients, and measureing things properly. He also did the math to quadruple the recipe. Since we haven't formally forayed into the multiplication tables or fractions, I was happy that he figured it all out accurately!

This Gingerbread recipe ought to appeal to the gourmands among us--real ginger root is the key ingredient.

Gingerbread Men

4 cups plain white flour
2 cup raw sugar
1 teaspoon bi-carb soda
2 teaspoon cinnamon
1 teaspoon of salt
4 full teaspoons of freshly chopped ginger (3+ inches of ginger root)
1 teaspoon ground dry ginger (opt)
250g (8 oz.) butter
4 small eggs
2 teaspoon golden syrup or honey

Sift the flour into a bowl and add the soda, cinnamon and salt. Rub in the butter until it all crumbles, then add the sugar, working it all into a dough. Grate the ginger or cut very finely. Finally add the beaten eggs and golden syrup and mix it all together. (Using your hands works best.)

Place some flour on a clean surface and roll out the dough flatly. If the mixture is still too sticky, add a little bit more flour. Cut into shapes and place on a greased tray and bung it in the oven at 180 C for about 15 to 20 minutes, leave to cool on the tray and eat them.

I've found that the ginger flavor matures if you refrigerate the dough overnight or store the cookies in a tin for a day or so. We piped details in white frosting on these last year, and they were our primary tree decoration. They still tasted yummy after hanging on the tree for awhile!

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December 09, 2004  |  Comments (18)  |  TrackBack (1)  |  Permalink

 

 

Simple Sugar Pie Crust

Simple Sugar Pie Crust

4 cups all-purpose flour
1 cup sugar
½ tsp baking soda
½ tsp salt
1 cup butter (2 sticks) cut into cubes
2 eggs
1 tsp amaretto or vanilla extract

Stir together flour, sugar, baking soda, and salt. Add the butter cubes. Go wash your hands again, and then squish the butter and flour mixture together until dough begins to clump together. It will still be dry. Add the eggs and amaretto, and mix into dough. You may want to use a fork, but you’ll likely need to use your hands again. Mix until dough comes together in a ball. Divide into two portions, and shape each into a disk. Cover and refrigerate about 20 minutes, until firm.

This pie crust is designed for pressing into the pie pan—not rolling it out. That’s what makes it a simple and easy recipe! Line the pie pan with cookie paper/parchment. Take 2/3rds of the dough and press it into the pan, starting at the center and working towards the sides. Trim excess dough on the sides to make it pretty. Use the remaining dough to make a partial top crust either with lattice, leaves, etc.

Makes two normal size pie crusts with some extra dough for the top of the pie for trimming. Use for pies like pecan and pumpkin, or crostata.

(modified from RealSimple’s “Sweet Sugar Crust” November 2004)

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November 20, 2004  |  Comments (8)  |  TrackBack (0)  |  Permalink

 

 

Apricot Crostata

Apricot Crostata

Simple Sugar Pie Crust
1 jar apricot jam

Preheat oven to 350 F / 180 C. Line a pizza pan with parchment / cookie paper to make serving and clean up much easier. Press 2/3rds of the dough onto the cookie sheet, starting in the center and working towards the edges. This dough patches together great, so don’t worry about it all being in one piece throughout the process. Create about a ½ inch rim around the edge.

In a saucepan, slowly heat the jam. When it is just melted, pour onto the crust and spread around with a spoon. (Be careful if kids are around—hot jam really burns!)

Divide the remaining dough into 8 portions. Using your fingers, work them into strips and lay them criss-cross across the jam in a lattice pattern. Bake until the crust is golden and jam starts to bubble—about 25-30 minutes.

The amaretto in the crust nicely compliments the apricot, though you can use any fruit jam your family likes. I just happen to have been blessed with kilos of apricots this year, and so am always looking for ways to use up our jam.

This recipe makes one pizza pan size crostata and one smallish (7 in diameter or so) one to give to a neighbor.


(modified from RealSimple’s “Reaspberry Crostata”, November 2004)


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November 20, 2004  |  Comments (2)  |  TrackBack (0)  |  Permalink

 

 

Brownie Recipes, Updated

Thanks to all who responded to my desperate plea for a non-boxed mix brownie recipe! I'm posting them all together so MaltaGirl and I can find them easily in the future. (And so you can find a quick chocolate cure for your PMSy days. . .)


CarolynM's Guilt-Free Recipe

Melt together in 1 1/2 qt. saucepan, stirring until smooth:
6 oz. semi-sweet chocolate chips (or 4 oz. semi-sweet or *dark* chocolate bar)
1/2 cup salted butter

Remove from heat; let cool. Stir in:
1 cup sugar
1 teaspoon vanilla (optional)

Add, mixing well:
2 large eggs

Stir together in 2nd bowl, then slowly fold into chocolate mixture:
1 cup all-purpose flour
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1 teaspoon cream of tartar

Pour into greased 8x8" pan and bake at 350 degrees for 25-30 minutes. (Test with toothpick to determine doneness -- these will *fall* if removed from oven too soon.)

Missy's Mississippi Mud

Have you ever made Mississippi Mud? I made some brownies for a church ice-cream social a few weeks ago. The brownies flopped, so I frantically made some Mississippi Mud. Since I was out of marshmallows & pecans, I made the frosting w/o. (I think it's better w/o the pecans & marshmallows.) It was unbelievably good, especially when it was still warm with a scoop of ice cream on top! The texture is a little different than regular brownies, a little fudgy and gritty. Gritty, not as in sandy but as in sugar that's not quite dissolved. I thought of it b/c it meets all your conditions.

Mississipi Mud Cake

1 c butter
1/2 c cocoa
2 c sugar
4 large eggs
1 1/2 c Flour
dash salt
1 tsp vanilla
1 1/2 c chopped pecans (optional)
4 c mini marshmallows (optional)

Frosting:

16 oz powdered sugar
1/2 c milk
1/3 c cocoa
1/4 c butter, softened

Combine butter and cocoa in saucepan, until butter melts. In large bowl, add sugar and eggs to butter mixture. Mix until blended. Add flour, salt, and vanilla & beat until blended. Stir in pecans. Bake (in a lightly greased 13x9 pan) @ 350 for 35 min. Remove from oven, sprinkle on the marshmallows & spread frosting over marshmallows.

Frosting: Combine all ingredients in bowl; beat until smooth, adding additional milk if frosting is too stiff. (I like it runny enough to pour)

Fittsy's Brownies

I'm not going to win the *brownie* points, but the very best recipe is on the back of Baker's Chocolate Unsweet Chocolate Squares (8oz. pack.) Make the recipe as is, omitting the nuts. After pouring the batter into the pan, top with 1/2-3/4 c. chocolate chips, 1 c. chopped pecans, and 3/4 c. Heath Brickle, and then bake according to the recipe directions.
Mmmm Boy. They are so good.
(Since bar chocolate is hard for you to get, you can add the chocolate chips, toffee (don't know about that availability) and nuts on top of any other recipe. I'm sure it will enhance just about any fudgy brownie recipe.)

Christy's One-Bowl Brownies

Here's our quick and favorite "One-Bowl Brownies". My 10 year old daughters make it independently with success. Just don't overmix! We usually skip the nuts.

2 c. sugar
1 1/3 c. all-purpose flour
3/4 c. baking cocoa
1 t. baking powder
1/2 t. salt
1/2 c. chopped nuts
2/3 c. vegetable oil
4 eggs, beaten
2 t. vanilla extract

In a large bowl, combine sugar, flour, cocoa, baking powder, salt and nuts. Add oil, eggs and vanilla; stir just until moistened. Don't overmix. Spread in a greased 13x9 in. pan. Bake at 350 for 20-23 minutes or until a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean.

Sherri-Ann's Gooey Brownies

This so far is the best ever gooey moist brownie recipe. People always ask me for it. So here goes
1 cup butter
2 cup sugar
2 tsp. vanilla
4 eggs slightly beaten
1 cup flour
1/2 cup cocoa
1/2 tsp salt
8 oz semi sweet chocolate coarsley chopped (I use chocolate chips too)
1 cup chopped pecans

Heat oven to 350 grease a 9 X 13 pan. In a med saucepan over low heat melt butter, add sugar, vanilla and eggs blend well. Stir in flour cocoa and salt;mix well. Add chocolate and pecans. Pour into greased pan.
Bake for 30-40 min. or until set
cool completely but into bars.

EarthGirl's Raisin Brownies

1/2 cup butter
1 cup sugar
2 eggs
1/2 cup flour
3 Tbs. cocoa
1/2 tsp. salt
1 tsp vanilla
2/3 cup raisins (or 1/2 cup nuts or nothing)

Cream butter and sugar. Add eggs and mix well. Combine dry ingredients and add. Add vanilla and raisins. Pour into an 8 inch square pan, greased and floured. Bake at 325 degrees for 30 minutes. Dust with powdered sugar while warm.

Deborah's Brownies

4+T. cocoa
1 stick butter, melted
1 cup or less sugar
1 T. vanilla or liquer (raspberry, orange)
2 eggs
1+T. oil
3/4 cup flour

Mix all together and pour into a 9-inch pan. Bake at 350 degrees for about 25 minuts: just when you start to smell them and the knife comes out clean.


Laura's Southern Living Brownies

2 c. white sugar
1 1/2 c. flour
1/2 c. + 2T. cocoa powder
1 c. melted margarine or butter
4 eggs
1 t. vanilla
1/4 t. salt

Mix all ingredients. Pour into greased dish of some size - 9x9, 8x13, whatever - and bake for 35 minutes at 325F. Allow to cool completely before cutting. Sometimes we add nuts or chocolate chips to the batter, but they're great plain, too.


Judith's About.Com Brownies

8 (1 oz.) squares of unsweetened chocolate
1 cup butter
5 eggs
3 cups sugar
1 Tablespoon vanilla
1-1/2 cups flour
2-1/2 cups chopped pecans, toasted

Preheat oven to 375 degrees F.

Melt chocolate and butter in a saucepan over low heat; set aside. In a mixer, beat eggs, sugar and vanilla at high speed for 10 minutes. Blend in chocolate and flour until just mixed. Stir in the nuts. Pour into a greased 9 X 13 inch pan.

Bake for 35-40 minutes. (Don't overbake.) Cool and frost if desired, but that is not necessary.

Still waiting for MtnMama's 'flourless choc cake' recipe . . .


And I've noticed several people starting separate blogs for recipes. Well, I'm not going to do that, but TulipGirl.com does have a Computer Cookbook category where I post my frequently used and favorite recipes.

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November 01, 2004  |  Comments (2)  |  TrackBack (0)  |  Permalink

 

 

Brownie Recipe?

I'm looking for an easy, from scratch brownie recipe that YOU like. The best brownies I've had come from a box, and the recipes I've tried here just don't seem. . . right.

So, if you have a great brownie recipe, please post it!

Brownie points to those whose recipes use cocoa or chocolate bars rather than baker's chocolate, baking soda rather than baking powder, and white sugar rather than brown sugar. Some things are hard to get here.

Thanks!

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October 28, 2004  |  Comments (13)  |  TrackBack (0)  |  Permalink

 

 

Chestnuts Roasting on an Open Fire

Chestnuts fell like hail, cracked open, and their brown nuts rolled out in front of us as we walked down Khreshatyk Street this afternoon. The boys gathered several up, and I'm trying to gather info on how to eat them (and what precautions are necessary.)

Do you have to roast them? How do you roast them without an open fire? Anything you can share about chestuts is appreciated.

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September 22, 2004  |  Comments (9)  |  TrackBack (0)  |  Permalink

 

 

Spaghetti Sauce for Canning

I found this recipe online last year, and it was great--though I ended up freezing it rather than canning it then.

Marilyn Crandall's Spaghetti Sauce for Canning

Ingredients :
1/2 cup salad oil
4 x cloves garlic
4 med onions
4 x green bell peppers
20 lb tomatoes
1/4 cup sugar
1/4 cup chopped parsley
2 tbl oregano leaves
2 tbl salt
3/4 tsp pepper
2 tsp basil
2 x bay leaves

Method :
Use the blender to liquefy tomatoes, onions, garlic, and peppers. Put in large kettle. Add other ingredients. Cook until desired thickness. Process in water bath, as you would other tomato preserves.

Makes 10 pints.

My notes:
1. Let the blender do the work! Use the olive oil or keep a bit of previously whirled tomatoes in the blender, and add the tomatoes whole, peppers de-seeded, and onions halved. Works great.
2. After washing the tomatoes, be sure to dry them well before blending them.
3. I add about a 1/4 tsp. of citric acid to the top of each jar--just as an extra preservative.
4. Don't alter the proportions of tomatoes/other veggies, to keep the sauce safe for canning.


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August 25, 2004  |  Comments (2)  |  TrackBack (0)  |  Permalink

 

 

Summer Institute 2: Cooking

I'm part of the Culinary Team for SI2. These are the menus and recipes we have planned.

Monday: American Menu

Grilled Chicken Salad
Poppyseed-Yogurt Dressing
Honey-Mustard Dressing
Croutons
Homemade Bread - Jamie Oliver Method
Chocolate Chip Cookies


Wednesday: Tex-Mex Menu
Chili Ukraine
Real Southern Cornbread
Salsa and Chips
Busy Day Cake
Easy Fudge Frosting


Monday: "Oriental" Menu
Stir Fry, with Chopping Directions from Mollie Katzen
Oven-baked Rice
Oriental Salad
American Brownies


Wednesday: Ukrainian Menu
To be announced, after our students plan it!

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July 21, 2004  |  Comments (8)  |  TrackBack (0)  |  Permalink

 

 

Chili Ukraine

1 large onion chopped
1 lb or ½ kilo ground beef
2 garlic cloves minced
2 jars whole tomatoes (920 g each)*
2 cans (430g) kidney beans in chili sauce**
2 tbs chili powder
2 tsp cumin
1 tbs basil

Combine meat, onion, and garlic in a large skillet until meat is browned. Drain if desired. Cut tomatoes with long knife while still in jar. Add entire contents with meat mixture to a large stew pot. Pour in beans with juice. Add spices and bring to a boil. Simmer on low for 15 minutes. (Recipe adjusted by Laura)

*НIЖИН brand Томати Консервованi в томатному соку or Чумак Томати
**Bonduelle Стерилiзована червона квасоля в чилi соусi


Чили с украинским наклоном

1 большая луковица, пошинкованная
½ кг. говяжьего фарша
2 зубца чеснока, мелко порезанного
2 банки томатов (920 г каждый) *
2 банки (430g) фасоли в соусе чили **
2 стол. ложки порошка чили
2 чайн. ложки тмина
1 стол. ложки базилика

В большой сковороде мешать мясо, лук и чеснок до тех пор, пока мясо не утратит красный цвет. Жир можно слить. Помидоры порезать длинным ножом прямо в банке и перелить вместе с мясом в большую кастрюлю. Добавить фасоль в соку, специи. Довести до кипения и варить на медленном огне 15 мин.

*НIЖИН Томати Консервованi в томатному соку или Чумак Томати
** Bonduelle Стерилiзована червона квасоля в чилi соусi

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July 21, 2004  |  Comments (0)  |  TrackBack (0)  |  Permalink

 

 

Southern Style Cornbread

2-4 tablespoons butter or bacon drippings
1 1/2 cups cornmeal
1/2 cup all-purpose flour
1 egg
1/2 cup buttermilk or sweet milk
1 tbsp vinegar
1 tbsp sugar
1/4 teaspoon of baking soda
water

Preheat the oven to 425°.

Put the shortening in a cast-iron skillet or baking pan and place in the oven. For a crusty cornbread, make sure there is a good "layer" of oil or shortening in the pan. Let cornmeal soap in milk and vinegar for 5-15 minutes before mixing the rest of the batter. Combine the cornmeal and flour, then mix in the egg and milk. Add water slowly, until the mixture is pourable (like thick pancake batter). Take the hot pan from the oven, pour some of the melted shortening (a tablespoon or more) into the batter, then pour the batter into the hot pan. Place back in the oven and bake for 20 to 25 minutes, until the outer crust is golden brown.

НАСТОЯЩИЙ ЮЖНЫЙ ХЛЕБ ИЗ КУКУРУЗНОЙ МУКИ

Советы: Раскаленную сковороду посыпьте кукурузной мукой перед тем, как влить тесто. Мука станет коричневого цвета и сделает корочку более хрустящей. Кстати, для того, чтобы хлеб получился хрустящим, не жалейте масла или жира.

Кукурузный хлеб

2-4 столовых ложек жира, масла или растопленного сала
1 1/2 стакан самоподнимающейся белой кукурузной муки
1/2 стакана пшеничной муки
1 яйцо
1/2 стакан пахты или молока
1/4 чайная ложка пищевой соды
вода

Духовку предварительно разогреть до 220° С.

Чугунную сковороду или лист противеня смазать жиром и поставить на средний огонь или в духовку. К кукурузной муке добавить муку пшеничную, яйцо и молоко. Воду добавлять небольшими количествами до тех пор, пока смесь не станет «переливаемой». Нагретую сковороду вынять из духовки, часть (столовую ложку или больше) растопленного жира перелить в мучную смесь, а ее затем вылить в сковороду. Сковороду вернуть в духовку и выпекать 20-25 минут, пока корочка хлеба не станет золотистого цвета.

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July 21, 2004  |  Comments (0)  |  TrackBack (0)  |  Permalink

 

 

Busy Day Cake

1 2/3 cup flour
1 cup sugar
1/4 tsp salt
½ tsp soda
1/3 cup butter
2/3 cup milk
1 egg
1 tsp vanilla

Easy to double.

Method 1: Cream together butter, sugar, then egg and vanilla. Add dry ingredients without mixing. Stir dry ingredients to be sure baking soda and salt are mixed in well. Fold into butter/sugar mixture. Fold in milk. Bake at 350 degrees for 30 minutes.


Easy Fudge Frosting

2 1/2 c. powdered sugar
1/4 c. unsweetened cocoa powder
1/4 c. butter, softened
1/4 c. boiling water
1 t. vanilla (opt.)

Beat the ingredients with an electric mixer for about 2 minutes. Frosts 1 one-layer cake.

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July 21, 2004  |  Comments (0)  |  TrackBack (0)  |  Permalink

 

 

Grilled Chicken Salad

Grilled Chicken Salad

1/4 cup soy sauce
2 tbsp honey
2 teaspoons vegetable oil
1/2 clove garlic, crushed
1 1/2 pounds skinless, boneless chicken breasts
8 cups mixed salad greens
1/2 cup shredded carrots
1/2 cup chopped green bell pepper
1/2 cup sliced green onions

1. Preheat broiler or grill. In a small bowl, combine soy sauce, brown sugar, oil and garlic. Reserve 1/3 of marinade. Brush remaining marinade over chicken. Broil the chicken, basting with reserved marinade, until cooked through, about 10 minutes. Cut into strips. Keep warm.

2. Meanwhile, combine salad greens, carrots, bell pepper and green onions in a salad bowl; toss lightly to mix. Combine mayonnaise and yogurt with in a small bowl.

3. Add warm chicken strips to salad and toss gently. Spoon dressing over salad and serve immediately.

Салат с курицей-гриль

¼ стакана соевого соуса
2 ст. ложки меда
2 чайн. ложки растительного масла
½ зубца чеснока, раздавить
700 г. куриного филе
8 стаканов листьев салата
½ стакана тертой моркови
½ стакана мелко порезанного зеленого перца
½ стакана порезанного зеленого лука

1. Предварительно подогреть жаровню. В маленькой посуде смешать соевый соус, неочищенный сахар, масло и чеснок. 1/3 маринада сохранить, а 2/3 кисточкой нанести на мясо. Курицу запекать в жаровне до готовности (около 10 мин.), помазывая время от времени оставшимся маринадом. Готовое мясо нарезать ломтиками и держать в тепле.

2. Пока готовится мясо, в салатнице смешать листья салата, морковь, перец и зеленый лук. Перемешать подбрасывающими движениями. Майонез и йогурт перемешать в отдельной небольшой посуде.

3. Горячие ломтики курицы добавить в салат и осторожно перемешать. Полить смесью майонеза с йогуртом и сразу подавать.

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July 19, 2004  |  Comments (2)  |  TrackBack (0)  |  Permalink

 

 

Honey-Mustard Dressing

1/4 cup mayonnaise (fat free)
1/4 cup Dijon mustard
1/4 cup honey
1 tablespoon prepared mustard
1 tablespoon white vinegar
1/8 teaspoon paprika

Mix together and refrigerate.


Заправка для салата из меда и горчицы

¼ стакана майонеза (можно обезжиренного)
¼ стакана горчицы Дижон
¼ стакана меда
1 столовая ложка готовой горчицы
1 столовая ложка уксуса
1/8 чайной ложки паприки

Соединить все компоненты и охладить

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July 19, 2004  |  Comments (0)  |  TrackBack (0)  |  Permalink

 

 

Poppyseed-Yogurt Dressing

1 (8-ounce) container plain yogurt
1 tablespoon poppy seeds
1 tablespoon honey
1 teaspoon orange juice
1/2 teaspoon cider vinegar
1/4 teaspoon grated orange peel

Combine all ingredients together and chill
Makes 1 cup. Recipe may be doubled.


Заправка для салата из мака и меда
(не очень жирная)

1 упаковку йогурта без вкусовых добавок
1 столовой ложка мака
1 столовой ложка меда
1 чайной ложка апельсинового сока
½ чайной ложки яблочного уксуса
¼ чайной ложки тертой цедры апельсина

Соединить все компоненты и охладить
Выход – 1 стакан. Рецепт может быть удвоен.


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July 19, 2004  |  Comments (7)  |  TrackBack (0)  |  Permalink

 

 

Croutons

10 slices of bread, heels are fine (homemade or store bought)
1/2 teaspoon basil
1/4 teaspoon oregano
1/4 teaspoon garlic powder
1/2 teaspoon celery salt (or 1/2 teaspoon salt, and 1/8 teaspoon celery seed)
1/4 to 1/3 cup oil

Using a very sharp, serrated knife, slice bread into small cubes. Suggestion: 5 cuts each direction, one down the center, and two to each side. Place all of the bread cubes into a large bowl.

Sprinkle on the seasonings. Toss briefly to mix in the seasonings. Next dribble in the oil somewhat evenly. Toss everything together. The oil will help the seasonings stick to the bread and also make the bread crispy without actually having to fry it.

Spread the croutons on a large cookie sheet, two if necessary. Bake at 350 degrees for 20 minutes or until they are crisp. Remove from the oven and allow to cool on the pan. Store the croutons in a plastic bag, or resealable container.


Сухари к салату

10 ломтиков хлеба, можно с корочкой
1/2 чайной ложки базилика
1/4 чайной ложки орегано
1/4 чайной ложки порошка чеснока
1/2 чайной ложки соли сельдерея (или 1/2 чайной ложки соли и 1/8 чайной ложки семян сельдерея)
1/4 - 1/3 стакана растительного масла

Используя очень острый, зазубренный нож, ломтики хлеба нарезать маленькими кубиками (по 5 раз в каждом направлении). Нарезанный хлеб поместить в большую емкость.

Добавить специи и подбрасывающими движениями хорошо перемешать. Затем равномерно добавить небольшое количество масла и еще раз перемешать. Масло заставит специи пристать к хлеба, а также сделает хлеб хрустящим.

Сухари разложить равномерно на одном или двух листах и выпекать при 180 С в течение 20 мин. или пока сухари не станут хрустящими. После выпечки сухарям дать остыть на листах. Хранить в пластиковом пакете или банке.


(Via The Hillbilly Housewife)

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July 19, 2004  |  Comments (0)  |  TrackBack (0)  |  Permalink

 

 

Homemade Bread

Using the easy Jamie Oliver Method

From Happy Days with The Naked Chef

Also explained online, though not as simply.

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July 19, 2004  |  Comments (0)  |  TrackBack (0)  |  Permalink

 

 

Chocolate Chip Cookies

Chocolate Chip Cookies (Ukraine variant)

2 ¼ cups flour (450-500 g flour)
1 TSP baking soda
1 TSP salt
1 cup butter, softened (200 g butter, softened)
1 ½ cup sugar (168 g sugar)
1 TBSP honey
1 pkt vanilla sugar
2 eggs
2 chocolate bars chopped into little pieces or 2 packets of M&Ms
Optional: 1 cup chopped nuts (224 g chopped nuts)

Preheat oven to 175 C. Cream together butter, honey, sugar, and vanilla. Add eggs. In separate bowl, mix flour, baking soda and salt. Add to butter mixture, slowly stirring in. Add chocolate pieces last.

Note: You may have to add more flour if dough is too sticky.

Lightly grease baking sheet or use baking paper, and drop teaspoonfuls of batter onto sheet. Bake for about 7-9 minutes or until lightly browned. Watch carefully because they burn easily.

Печенье с шоколадом (украинский вариант)

450-500 г. муки
1 чайн. ложка пищевой соды
1 чайн. ложка соли
200 г. размягченного сливочного масла
168 г. сахара
1 ст. ложки меда
1 пакетик ванильного сахара
2 яйца
2 плитки шоколада, поломанные на маленькие кусочки или 2 пачки M&M
Вариант: 1 стакан орехов, нарезанных мелкими кусочками

Духовку предварительно разогреть до 175-190 C. Растереть вместе масло, мед, сахар и ваниль. Добавить яйца. В отдельной посуде перемешать муку, соду и соль и, медленно помешивая, пересыпать в первую массу. В последнюю очередь добавить шоколад. Если тесто слишком липкое, добавить муки.

Противень слегка смазать маслом и на него чайными ложками выложить массу. Выпекать 7-9 минут или пока печенье не приобретет светло-коричневый цвет. Осторожно, печенье может легко сгореть.

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July 19, 2004  |  Comments (0)  |  TrackBack (0)  |  Permalink

 

 

Moosewood Fans

Does anyone own "The Moosewood Cookbook" or "The Enchanted Broccoli Forest"? Mine are in storage and I'd really like a scan or photo of a particular page, as I help prepare for the cooking portion of the upcoming Summer Institute.

Would you post or e-mail me if you have those books?

And if you haven't yet seen it, check out MollieKatzen.com for soul and food inspiration.

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July 10, 2004  |  Comments (6)  |  TrackBack (0)  |  Permalink

 

 

More Strawberries!

I thought the strawberry season had already ended in Kyiv. Perhaps due to the mild spring and summer, it's been extended. Today I bought another 7 kilos of strawberries (and at the best price I've seen all year!) I began a batch of conserves, made another batch of jam, cleaned some for dessert tomorrow night, and started a jar of Rumtopf. This looks like a great recipe for incorporating a whole summer's worth of fruits!

Rumtopf

A traditional German treat.

Ingredients:
2 lbs. fruit, such as strawberries, blackberries, black currants, red currants, peaches, apricots, cherries and plums. Avoid apples and blueberries.
1 ¼ cups sugar
4 cups white rum

1. Prepare fruit: remove stems, skins, cores and stones. Cut larger fruit into bitesize pieces. Combine fruit and sugar in large, non-metalic bowl. Cover and leave to stand for 30-60 minutes.
2. Spoon the fruit and juices into a sterilized 5 pint preserving or earthenware jar and pour in the white rum to cover.
3. Cover the jar with clear film. Seal and store in a cool, dark place.
4. As space allows and as different fruits come into season, add more fruit, sugar, and rum in the appropriate proportions, as described above.
5. When the jar is full, store in a cool, dark place for two months. Serve the fruit spooned over ice cream or other desserts, and enjoy the rum in glasses as a liqueur. Traditionally a part of Christmas celebrations.


Modified from this great book that I've borrowed from a friend--but I really want my own!


Update: To the rum and strawberries, I've now added cherries and red currants.

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July 07, 2004  |  Comments (11)  |  TrackBack (0)  |  Permalink

 

 

Elephant Tusk Sandwiches

The boys were excited tonight when I announced they could make themselves Elephant Tusk Sandwiches for dinner.


Elephant Tusk Sandwiches

Two Pieces of Bread
An Elephant Tusk
Elephant Food

The bread holds the sandwich together. Spread elephant food on each slice of bread. (What do elephants like to eat? Peanuts and peanut butter!) Slice an elephant tusk (banana) lengthwise so it will lie flat on the bread. Enjoy with a glass of milk to wash down the crumbs.

This is a recipe I remember from childhood--it was either in Highlights magazine or the Betty Crocker cookbook for kids.

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May 21, 2004  |  Comments (4)  |  TrackBack (0)  |  Permalink

 

 

Chunky Granola

It's been fun experimenting with granola here in Kyiv. I have an abundance of inexpensive kasha grains readily available--I can't identify them all and my Russian dictionary doesn't give much detail beyond "grain cereal." I think we've used oats, wheat, corn, buckwheat, millet, and I'm not sure what else.

My favorite recipe is Mollie Katzen's stove-top, dry roasted granola. (I believe is in her "Enchanted Broccoli Forest" cookbook.) It's best for small batches of granola.

For large batches, I like this recipe. It is low-fat and I can adjust it to be low-sugar. The technique that makes it "chunky granola" also helps the smaller, crushed grains, be part of the chunks instead of gathering at the bottom of the granola jar.

CHUNKY GRANOLA

8 c Rolled oats
1 c Nuts (more if desired -- up to double this amount)
1/2 c Sunflower seeds
1/2 c Whole millet -OR- whole buckwheat groats
3 c Whole wheat flour (or more)
-OR- part cornmeal, rice flour,or other whole-grain flour
1 t Salt (or more, as desired)
1/2 c Honey (or more, -- up to double this amount)
1 c -Hot water, or up to:
2 c -Hot water *
1 t Vanilla

* Note: More water makes the granola chunkier, less makes it crumbly.

Preheat oven to 350 F. In a large bowl or pot, combine oats, nuts, seeds, millet, flour, and salt. Mix together honey, water, and vanilla, and stir into dry ingredients. Spread on a lightly oiled baking sheet and squeeze mixture together to form small chunks, but don't crowd; the chunks need to bake clear through. Roast until golden brown, about 10 to 20 minutes. (With the larger amount of water, reduce heat and bake longer.) As it bakes the granola may need stirring to brown evenly. Cool thoroughly before storing.

Variations: Replace part of the water with the freshly squeezed juice of 2 oranges (and add the grated rinds if the oranges were not sprayed with pesticides), or use 2 teaspoons orange oil.

For "gingerbread" granola, use half molasses (for half honey) and add 2 teaspoons cinnamon, 1 teaspoon ginger and 1/4 teaspoon cloves.

For a nice change, substitute maple syrup for honey.

Source: "Diet for Small Planet" by Frances Moore Lappe


Family Favorites:

* Pina Colada Granola: No nuts, dried coconut, dried pineapple bits, coconut sweetened condensed milk

* Carmel Apple Crunch: Dried apples, raisins, dinnamon, carmel sweetened condensed milk, walnuts


Variations:

* I like to use sweetened condensed milk in place of the honey, because it is less expensive and I can get flavored milks here (peach, coconut, strawberry, lemon.) I usually use half a can for a big recipe--I find I need very little sweetner when adding dried fruits.

* I like to add a handful or two of store bought cereals--rice puffs, corn flakes, whatever--to give a little more variety to the texture.

* I use a cream-of-wheat type kasha in place of the flour in this recipe, and use a bit less than the recipe suggests.

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March 31, 2004  |  Comments (10)  |  TrackBack (0)  |  Permalink

 

 

California Flan

We did have enchiladas for dinner before Bible study tonight. Yum. *grin* My favorite dessert when we have a group over for Tex-Mex is California Flan. I usually double this recipe, and add an extra egg or two because it is so sweet.

California Flan

Ingredients :
3/4 cup Sugar
4 x Eggs
14 oz Sweetened condensed milk
1 cup Water
2 tsp Vanilla

Method :
* Place sugar in skillet and cook, stirring, over moderate heat until melted and golden brown. Pour into 1-quart casserole and swirl to coat sides and bottom evenly with caramel. Beat eggs. Add milk and beat until blended.

* Beat in water and vanilla. Turn into prepared baking dish and place in pan containing 1 inch hot water. Bake at 325F 1 hour 40 minutes, or until knife inserted in center comes out clean. Cool completely, then turn out on serving plate. Serves 6 to 8

Credit where credit is due: I think that I first found this at RecipeSource.Com.

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March 04, 2004  |  Comments (5)  |  TrackBack (0)  |  Permalink

 

 

Carin's Almond Chicken

Each Thursday, before Bible study, we have a fellowship dinner. It's one of the ways that we get to spend more time getting to know people. And for me, it's a way that I can reach out while still being very busy in the home. Tonight we had Almond Chicken--one of my newest favorite recipes, that my friend Carin shared with me.

Carin's Almond Chicken

½ C flour
1/3 C butter, melted
1 t celery salt
1 t paprika
½ t salt
½ t curry
½ t oregano
¼ t pepper
6 boneless chicken breasts
1 ½ C whipping cream
1/3 C dry bread crumbs
¾ C sliced, toasted almonds

Add spices to melted butter. Cover chicken with flour; dip into butter mixture. Place in dish (9x13). Pour cream around chicken. Bake, covered, at 350 for 45 minutes. Combine bread crumbs with remaining butter (or melt more). Remove chicken from oven, uncover, sprinkle with buttered crumbs and almonds. Bake uncovered for 5-8 minutes.
Serve with warm pasta.

Carin's Notes: I never toast the almonds (and my slicing is dubious – in fact, once I left out the almonds all together!), I rarely measure the butter, and have used half cream half milk or other variations. The only spices included in the recipe that I do not buy here are celery salt and oregano.

My Notes: I serve this with rice, because whenever I make pasta for a crowd it's too starchy and sticky. Instead of heavy cream (which is expensive here) I use 6% milk, and it turns out just fine. Though, I don't remember if 6% milk is available in the States. I make mine without celery salt, because I don't have any--it still tastes good, but Carin's is better. This recipe doubles easily. I usually cut chicken breasts into thirds, so that I can serve less meat to the children. Tonight, 10 breasts served 12 adults and 4 children, with enough left over to send home with a friend for her husband and mother.

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February 26, 2004  |  Comments (5)  |  TrackBack (0)  |  Permalink

 

 


 
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