Why I Study Psychology and Theology


Nearly all the wisdom we possess -- almost everything we know -- can be summed up under the knowledge of God and the knowledge of ourselves.

--John Calvin

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January 31, 2008  |  Comments (3)  |  TrackBack (0)  |  Permalink

 

 

Shaking the Dust

"Finish each day and be done with it. You have done what you could; some blunders and absurdities have crept in; forget them as soon as you can. Tomorrow is a new day; you shall begin it serenely and with too high a spirit to be encumbered with your old nonsense."

--Ralph Waldo Emerson

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November 28, 2007  |  Comments (7)  |  TrackBack (0)  |  Permalink

 

 

For a Friend, Remembering

"Let not your hearts be troubled. Believe in God; believe also in me. In my Father's house are many rooms. If it were not so, would I have told you that I go to prepare a place for you? And if I go and prepare a place for you, I will come again and will take you to myself, that where I am you may be also. . . . I will not leave you as orphans; I will come to you. Yet a little while and the world will see me no more, but you will see me. Because I live, you also will live. In that day you will know that I am in my Father, and you in me, and I in you. . . . Peace I leave with you; my peace I give to you. Not as the world gives do I give to you. Let not your hearts be troubled, neither let them be afraid."

Selections from John 14

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July 07, 2007  |  Comments (2)  |  TrackBack (0)  |  Permalink

 

 

Still Need That Shoulder

What About Mine?

When you cried as a little baby
Mom and daddy let you cry
Thought that that was the best way maybe
To make you grow all strong inside
Now that you're older
You need someone's shoulder
What about mine?

Growing' up your mind was closed
For repairs for a long long time
You could feel the loneliness in your hairstyle
Just like mine
Now that you've grown up
You still need that shoulder
What the hell are you waiting' for?
It's mine

I promise not to chase you
Only to embrace you
I promise not to bug you
Only just to hug you all night

When you was a little baby
Mom and dad they let you cry
They thought that's the best way maybe
To make you all strong inside
(Were they) wrong? (Yes)
Mine……What about mine?

--Paul Westerberg

Hear it Barlowised.

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May 18, 2007  |  Comments (0)  |  TrackBack (0)  |  Permalink

 

 

One Anothering

For the Mommy-Inspiration Files. . .

The Blanket Commands

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May 03, 2007  |  Comments (0)  |  TrackBack (0)  |  Permalink

 

 

Goals, Desires, Dreams 2007

I don't like the word "resolution"--it has connotations that feel as if it is almost designed to set us up for failure. But I do like having the ritual of evaluating the past year, thinking of goals for the upcoming year, and daydreaming about the future.

So in that spirit, I'm recording my goals, desires and dreams as well as reflecting upon those from past years.

Goals:

1. Hold my nose with the bureaucracy, and actually take a couple of college classes. (Fingers crossed for a statistics class starting next Monday.)
2. Floss almost daily.
3. Feed my family in a healthier manner, and utilize meal planning to aid in this.
4. Minimize my sugar intake.
5. Read aloud more to the boys. (Hmmm. . . I'd really like to have certain books/series set as a goal, but not sure which ones to choose.)


Desires:
1. Get a bike (my Christmas present!) and take regular bike rides with the boys.
2. Go on a road trip with the family. Chicago? Arizona?
3. Weekly photos, in the spirit of Project 365--only downsized.
4. Simplify. Beautify.

Dreams (ala Mondo Beyondo):
Still pondering. . .



This is not a definitive list, and is open to updating and modification. . . *grin*

Continue reading "Goals, Desires, Dreams 2007"

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January 01, 2007  |  Comments (19)  |  TrackBack (0)  |  Permalink

 

 

Soul and Sea

"I must live a little each day, greet the sun as it rises and revel in its setting, swim naked, sip cofee and wine by the shore, generate new ideas, admire myself, talk to animals, mediated, laugh, risk adventures. I must try to be soft, not hard; fluid not rigid; tender, not cold; find rather than seek. I have been embraced by the sea, tested by its elements, emptied of anxiety, cleansed with fresh thought. IN the process, I have recovered myself."

--Joan Anderson, A Year by the Sea

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November 25, 2006  |  Comments (0)  |  TrackBack (0)  |  Permalink

 

 

Teleological Psychology

I've been listening to a series of lectures through UC/Berkley (hi, Dan!) on Human Emotion, and tonight's lecture had some interesting tidbits about oxytocin and monogamy.

Very interesting stuff.

I'm in awe at how God has designed us, the complexities, the subtleties. Learning more about both body and soul feels like putting together a puzzle, one which I know I'll never have all the pieces. The "picture" gets bigger and clearer, but I still know I'm only getting a glimpse of His amazing design.

What a glimse, too? Read this about Mommies, Babies and Attachment.

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November 08, 2006  |  Comments (6)  |  TrackBack (0)  |  Permalink

 

 

To Know Ourselves, We Must Know God

Our wisdom, in so far as it ought to be deemed true and solid Wisdom, consists almost entirely of two parts: the knowledge of God and of ourselves. But as these are connected together by many ties, it is not easy to determine which of the two precedes and gives birth to the other. For, in the first place, no man can survey himself without forthwith turning his thoughts towards the God in whom he lives and moves. . . . On the other hand, it is evident that man never attains to a true self-knowledge until he have previously contemplated the face of God, and come down after such contemplation to look into himself.

John Calvin, Institutes of the Christian Religion
Chapter 1, from sections 1-2

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September 03, 2006  |  Comments (0)  |  TrackBack (0)  |  Permalink

 

 

Spurgeon: The Valley of the Shadow

I know that wise brethren say, "You should not give way to feelings of depression." Quite right, no more we should. But we do; and perchance when your brain is as weary as ours you will not bear yoursleves more bravely than we do. "But desponding people are very much to be blamed." I know they are, but they are also very much to be pitied; and, perhaps, if those who blame quite so furiously could once know what depression is, they would think it cruel to scatter blame where comfort is needed. There are experiences of the children of God which are full of spiritual darkness; and I am almost persuaded that those of God’s servants who have been most highly favoured have, nevertheless, suffered more times of darkness than others.

Charles Spurgeon, in a sermon on the text "Yea, though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death, I will fear no evil; for thou art with me."

The Spurgeon Archive, a repository of all things Spurgeon
Curator: Phil Johnson

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August 28, 2006  |  Comments (3)  |  TrackBack (0)  |  Permalink

 

 

The Profane, The Wise, And Common Grace

"Therefore, in reading profane authors, the admirable light of truth displayed in them should remind us, that the human mind, however much fallen and perverted from its original integrity, is still adorned and invested with admirable gifts from its Creator. If we reflect that the Spirit of God is the only fountain of truth, we will be careful, as we would avoid offering insult to him, not to reject or condemn truth wherever it appears. In despising the gifts, we insult the Giver. How, then, can we deny that truth must have beamed on those ancient lawgivers who arranged civil order and discipline with so much equity? Shall we say that the philosophers, in their exquisite researches and skilful description of nature, were blind? Shall we deny the possession of intellect to those who drew up rules for discourse, and taught us to speak in accordance with reason? Shall we say that those who, by the cultivation of the medical art, expended their industry in our behalf were only raving? What shall we say of the mathematical sciences? Shall we deem them to be the dreams of madmen? Nay, we cannot read the writings of the ancients on these subjects without the highest admiration; an admiration which their excellence will not allow us to withhold. But shall we deem anything to be noble and praiseworthy, without tracing it to the hand of God? Far from us be such ingratitude; an ingratitude not chargeable even on heathen poets, who acknowledged that philosophy and laws, and all useful arts were the inventions of the gods. Therefore, since it is manifest that men whom the Scriptures term carnal, are so acute and clear-sighted in the investigation of inferior things, their example should teach us how many gifts the Lord has left in possession of human nature, notwithstanding of its having been despoiled of the true good.

Moreover, let us not forget that there are most excellent blessings which the Divine Spirit dispenses to whom he will for the common benefit of mankind. For if the skill and knowledge required for the construction of the Tabernacle behaved to be imparted to Bezaleel and Aholiab, by the Spirit of God (Exod. 31:2; 35:30), it is not strange that the knowledge of those things which are of the highest excellence in human life is said to be communicated to us by the Spirit. Nor is there any ground for asking what concourse the Spirit can have with the ungodly, who are altogether alienated from God? For what is said as to the Spirit dwelling in believers only, is to be understood of the Spirit of holiness by which we are consecrated to God as temples. Notwithstanding of this, He fills, moves, and invigorates all things by the virtue of the Spirit, and that according to the peculiar nature which each class of beings has received by the Law of Creation. But if the Lord has been pleased to assist us by the work and ministry of the ungodly in physics, dialectics, mathematics, and other similar sciences, let us avail ourselves of it, lest, by neglecting the gifts of God spontaneously offered to us, we be justly punished for our sloth. . .

John Calvin, Institutes of the Christian Religion
Book 2, Chapter 2, sections 15-16

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August 25, 2006  |  Comments (2)  |  TrackBack (0)  |  Permalink

 

 

The Profane, The Wise, And Common Grace

"Therefore, in reading profane authors, the admirable light of truth displayed in them should remind us, that the human mind, however much fallen and perverted from its original integrity, is still adorned and invested with admirable gifts from its Creator. If we reflect that the Spirit of God is the only fountain of truth, we will be careful, as we would avoid offering insult to him, not to reject or condemn truth wherever it appears. In despising the gifts, we insult the Giver. How, then, can we deny that truth must have beamed on those ancient lawgivers who arranged civil order and discipline with so much equity? Shall we say that the philosophers, in their exquisite researches and skilful description of nature, were blind? Shall we deny the possession of intellect to those who drew up rules for discourse, and taught us to speak in accordance with reason? Shall we say that those who, by the cultivation of the medical art, expended their industry in our behalf were only raving? What shall we say of the mathematical sciences? Shall we deem them to be the dreams of madmen? Nay, we cannot read the writings of the ancients on these subjects without the highest admiration; an admiration which their excellence will not allow us to withhold. But shall we deem anything to be noble and praiseworthy, without tracing it to the hand of God? Far from us be such ingratitude; an ingratitude not chargeable even on heathen poets, who acknowledged that philosophy and laws, and all useful arts were the inventions of the gods. Therefore, since it is manifest that men whom the Scriptures term carnal, are so acute and clear-sighted in the investigation of inferior things, their example should teach us how many gifts the Lord has left in possession of human nature, notwithstanding of its having been despoiled of the true good.

Moreover, let us not forget that there are most excellent blessings which the Divine Spirit dispenses to whom he will for the common benefit of mankind. For if the skill and knowledge required for the construction of the Tabernacle behaved to be imparted to Bezaleel and Aholiab, by the Spirit of God (Exod. 31:2; 35:30), it is not strange that the knowledge of those things which are of the highest excellence in human life is said to be communicated to us by the Spirit. Nor is there any ground for asking what concourse the Spirit can have with the ungodly, who are altogether alienated from God? For what is said as to the Spirit dwelling in believers only, is to be understood of the Spirit of holiness by which we are consecrated to God as temples. Notwithstanding of this, He fills, moves, and invigorates all things by the virtue of the Spirit, and that according to the peculiar nature which each class of beings has received by the Law of Creation. But if the Lord has been pleased to assist us by the work and ministry of the ungodly in physics, dialectics, mathematics, and other similar sciences, let us avail ourselves of it, lest, by neglecting the gifts of God spontaneously offered to us, we be justly punished for our sloth. . .

John Calvin, Institutes of the Christian Religion
Book 2, Chapter 2, sections 15-16

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August 25, 2006  |  Comments (2)  |  TrackBack (0)  |  Permalink

 

 

God's Science, Understood By Men

"As far as the principle of interpretation is concerned, the natural man makes himself the final point of reference. So far, then, as he carries through his principle, he interprets all things without God. In principle he is hostile to God. But he cannot carry through his principle completely. He is restrained by God from doing so. Being restrained by God from doing so, he is enabled to make contributions to the edifice of human knowledge, the forces of creative power implanted in him are to some extent released by God's common grace. He therefore makes positive contributions to science in spite of his principles and because both he and the universe are the exact opposite of what he, by his principles, thinks they are."

Cornelius Van Til , A Christian Theory of Knowledge, pp 21, 22

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August 22, 2006  |  Comments (0)  |  TrackBack (0)  |  Permalink

 

 


 
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